James D. Le SueurAlgeria Since 1989: Between Terror and Democracy

Zed Books, 2010

by Jonathan Judaken and Justin Willingham on November 12, 2014

James D. Le Sueur

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[Cross-posted from New Books in French Studies] ”History doesn’t repeat itself,” so the saying goes, “but it does rhyme.”  This is particularly true in the recent history of the Middle East. As James D. Le Seuer, author of Algeria Since 1989: Between Terror and Democracy (Zed Books, 2010), explains in this interview, much of what we are seeing in, say, Egypt today played out in Algeria two decades ago. Is Algeria an augur of things to come in the Middle East? Listen in.

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Olufemi TaiwoAfrica Must be Modern: A Manifesto

November 6, 2014

Olufemi Taiwo’s unremittingly honest and daring book, Africa Must be Modern: A Manifesto (Indiana University Press, 2014), confronts the reluctance, if not outright hostility, of many Africans to embrace modernity. He shows how this hostility has stifled the continent’s economic development and how it has impeded social and political transformation. Only by tapping into the [...]

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Amy EvrardThe Moroccan Women’s Rights Movement

October 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Book in Gender Studies] Amy Evrard‘s first book, The Moroccan Women’s Rights Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2014), examines women’s attempts to change their patriarchal society via their movement for equality and rights. At the center of Evrard’s book is the 2004 reform of the Family Code known as the Mudawwana, in which Moroccan [...]

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Ernest Harsch Thomas Sankara: An African Revolutionary

October 10, 2014

Thomas Sankara, often called the African Che Guevara, was president of Burkina Faso, one of the poorest countries in Africa, until his assassination during a military coup that brought down his government. Although his time in office was relatively short, Sankara left an indelible mark on his country’s history and development. But as Ernest Harsch [...]

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Todd ClevelandStones of Contention: A History of Africa’s Diamonds

October 3, 2014

“Diamonds are forever” or “Blood diamonds”—the one a pithy marketing slogan showing how diamonds encapsulate enduring love and commitment and the other a call to conscience about the violence and suffering the quest for diamonds has entailed throughout Africa, the supplier of the majority of the world’s diamonds. In his engagingly written and concise history, [...]

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Rebecca RogersA Frenchwoman’s Imperial Story: Madame Luce in Nineteenth-Century Algeria

October 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Biography] In the early 1830s, the French school teacher Eugénie Luce migrated to Algeria. A decade later, she was a major force in the debates around educational practices there, insisting that not only were women entitled to quality education, but that women’s education served a fundamental role in the French mission in [...]

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Kwasi KonaduTransatlantic Africa, 1440-1888

September 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Most of what we know about the trans-Atlantic slave trade–particularly before the nineteenth century–comes from documents produced by slavers and those Europeans and euro-Americans who interacted with them. Most, but, as Kwasi Konadu points out in Transatlantic Africa, 1440-1888 (Oxford University Press, 2014), not all. It is possible, Konadu shows, to construct a narrative of [...]

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Deborah MayersenOn the Path to Genocide: Armenia and Rwanda Reexamined

September 23, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Genocide] I live and work in the state of Kansas in the US.  We think of ourselves as living in tornado alley and orient our schedules in the spring around the weather report.  Earthquakes are something that happen somewhere else. Recently, however, our southern neighbor, Oklahoma, has been rocked repeatedly by [...]

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Toby GreenThe Rise of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in Western Africa, 1300-1589

July 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Slavery was pervasive in the Ancient World: you can find it in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In Late Antiquity , however, slavery went into decline. It survived and even flourished in the Byzantine Empire and Muslim lands, yet it all but disappeared in Medieval Western and Central Europe. Then, rather [...]

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Samuel TottenGenocide by Attrition: The Nuba Mountains of Sudan

July 18, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Genocide Studies] Most of the authors I’ve interviewed for this show have addressed episodes in the past, campaigns of mass violence that occurred long ago, often well-before the author was born. Today’s show is different. In his book Genocide by Attrition: The Nuba Mountains of Sudan (Transaction Publishers, 2012), Samuel Totten addresses the violence against [...]

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